Category Archives: Shabbat Shalom

Shabbat Shalom

Nava Tehila performs a soulful rendition of Yedid Nefesh, the beautiful poem we use to welcome Kabbalat Shabbat.  Written by Eleazar Azkiri in the 16th century, Yedid Nafesh is considered to be a love song to God based on an acrostic for God’s name, each stanza begins with one of the four letters of the Divine Name. (the youtube link will take you to other Nava Tehila songs after Yedid Nefesh- enjoy them all)

Wishing everyone Shabbat Shalom

Shabbat (HaGadol) Shalom

Although this piece was produced last year, it is worth sharing with you now as we welcome Shabbat HaGadol, the Shabbat immediately preceding Pesach.  This is the Key Tov Orchestra featuring Elliot Dvorin at their schmaltzy best.  It’s a little Vegas combined with tunes from our wonderful holiday.  It seems somehow fitting that this East meets West happens in Daley Plaza in downtown Chicago.  Enjoy!

Wishing everyone  Shabbat Shalom and a zissen Pesach!

Shabbat Shalom

The gifted Shai Sebbag shares Shalom Aleichem on his guitar.

 

Shalom Aleichem- Peace be with you, our traditional liturgical greeting of Shabbat dating back to the mystics of Tzfat (Safed) from the 16th or 17th century.

The story goes that two angels accompanied us on our way back home from the synagogue for Shabbat Dinner on Friday night.  If the home was ready for Shabbat, the good angel blessed that next Shabbat it should also be so, and the bad angel would respond “Amen”.  If the house was not ready for Shabbat, the roles were reversed.

Peace upon you, ministering angels, messengers of the Most High,                                      of the Supreme King of Kings, the Holy One, blessed be He.
Come in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,                                     of the Supreme King of Kings, the Holy One, blessed be He.
Bless me with peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,                           of the Supreme King of Kings, the Holy One, blessed be He.
May your departure be in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,       of the Supreme King of Kings, the Holy One, blessed be He.
Translation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shalom_Aleichem_(liturgy)

Shabbat Shalom

This past weekend, I had the honor of attending a wedding. In typical Orthodox fashion, it seemed the immediate world was invited. Friends and family from across the globe came to celebrate. It was an evening of unbridled joy; food and drink were in abundance, but most importantly there was dancing and music.

The Tisch was raucous and the men escorted the groom in a fever pitch of singing and dancing so he could veil his bride. At the conclusion of the ceremony, the crowd gathered to the chuppah to escort bride and groom out with the same energy and fervor.

The band was amazing, keeping everyone on dancing for almost the entire evening. The large dance floor was crowded to overflowing. At first, I tried to watch from the sidelines, clapping to the beat of the music, but an elderly chossid grabbed my hand and pulled me into the circle of other old men dancing and jumping in merriment.

The entire spectrum of Jewish practice was in attendance Sunday night. We were all united in the joy and celebration of a wedding, that magical moment of hope and light shining in a world so desperately in need of it, the central message of the Sheva Brachot. It was amazing to behold and to participate. May it always be so.

Shabbat Shalom

Gad Elbaz beautifully sings the final verse of Lecha Dodi, welcoming the bride to the music of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah.  Enjoy.